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Pit Stops: Roadside Barbecue Worth Pulling Over For

Contributing Writer Contributing Writer
Whether they’re checking out the newest restaurants or enjoying a stay at a bed-and-breakfast, contributing writers share their unique insight and stories from exploring the Palmetto State.
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The magic of a road trip lies in what you’ll discover along the way. In South Carolina, our old country backroads and byways are dotted with hidden gem barbecue joints that cherish old ways of cooking and recipes handed down through generations.

If you’re driving down to Charleston, be sure to exit I-26 to try Rodney Scott’s Whole Hog BBQ, helmed by James Beard award-winning Chef Rodney Scott, who pit-cooks whole hogs and mops them with a spicy vinegar pepper sauce for divine flavor. At Scott’s Bar-B-Que just off Hemingway Highway in Pee Dee Country, pull over to see where the famed chef honed his pit prowess—by helping his parents in their own roadside barbecue joint.

At Anderson’s Creekside Bar-Be-Que in The Upcountry, order a plate of beef brisket slow-smoked over pecan and hickory woods. Or if you’re following SC-46 or US-278 on your way down to Hilton Head Island, detour to Bluffton BBQ for a rack of ribs and Southern sides like Brunswick stew and sweet potato casserole.

Hankering for a bit of everything? Take a break from the wheel at a buffet such as Lee’s Barbecue & Catering Service on SC-72 in Waterloo or Shuler’s BBQ on SC-38 in Latta, where you’ll find a full spread of smoked meats and all the down-home sides. Meanwhile, Lone Star Barbecue & Mercantile, just off Old Number Six Highway in Santee, is comprised of several country stores, a buffet, antiques and live bluegrass on weekends.

Celebrated pitmaster, Rodney Scott, gives whole hogs a sauce mopping at his Charleston restaurant.

Tips from the Pitmasters Guide to Roadside Barbecue

Local pit pros share their insider tips for finding the best barbecue around.

“My rule of thumb is: I want to hear one place [recommended to me] three times from three different people. There’s nothing scientific about it—it just works.” —Ted Huffman, Pit Master & Owner, Bluffton BBQ, Bluffton

“When I see a place that’s total barbecue, not open for breakfast and not in some great big, glitzy, fancy building, I’ll stop.”—Norton Hughes, Pit Master & Co-Owner, Shuler’s BBQ, Latta

“I want to see smoke coming over the building. I want to smell it; I want to see it. For barbecue, there needs to be large amounts of smoke. I want to see a big woodpile.”—Kurt Wickiser, Pit Master & Co-owner, Creekside Bar-Be-Que, Anderson

 

Contributing Writer
Contributing Writer
More from "Contributing Writer"
Whether they’re checking out the newest restaurants or enjoying a stay at a bed-and-breakfast, contributing writers share their unique insight and stories from exploring the Palmetto State.